Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Stud Sisters


We're waiting for the plumber, electrician and HVAC people to
come and do their thing but let me show you what's been going on.

The rough framing for the back porches has passed inspection so work
can now proceed to finish those up.
 


Inside, the new subfloor is installed.
 
On the window wall--this is where the stove was--the wall has been
pumped up with 2x6s.  This is not only to get a nice plumb wall... 


...but also to get the plumbing stack to from the upstairs
bathroom to the basement without having a bumpout in the wall
along with a nice bit of foam insulation.

You can see the new sill and header for the kitchen window that is being moved
up above counter height.  The new sink will be centered over this window.
 

 
All of the other studs are getting a 2x4 sistered alongside them.


Every single one.
 

 
None of the studs are vertical or on the same plane so
these 2x4s will correct that mess which should make
cabinet and countertop installation much easier.
 
Before the electrician comes to do the rough wiring, I
need to finalize my lighting plan.  It'll be exciting to have more
than one light fixture in the middle of the room!

67 comments:

  1. Having more than one light fixture in the center of the room, is indeed, exciting. I am working on a project just like that and finding the extra lighting options so much fun to hunt for.

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    1. It is fun but a little overwhelming. I swear there are a billion different options.

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  2. In my kitchen reno,the whole lighting thing was the one thing that sent me into a tizzy.I thought I got enough,but I was wrong.I should've taken the electrician's advice.Get as much under cabinet lighting as you can.

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    1. Hmmm. But what if there's no upper cabinets?

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  3. Wow, it's really great to see your progress and the stage is being perfectly set for the the new kitchen. I know I will love seeing everything you chose, but it's also been neat to see all the behind-the-scenes stuff for someone like me who's never renovated before. Thanks for sharing it all. :)

    xo T.

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    1. I didn't realize how far out of square and out of plumb everything was. These are things you don't notice until you start wallpapering or tiling. So it will be nice to know I shouldn't run into too many of those problems down the road.

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  4. Something about seeing all that new wood has such a calming effect.
    I'm sure it really does for you!
    I think that besides the lighting concerns, I would worry about the placement of outlets.
    I got my electrical updated and new wiring a few years back and I still regret not having another outlet on the south wall of my kitchen.
    Good luck! it's looking good!

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    1. You know, you're right. Going from all that dark, somber wood that seemed to sad, the new wood adds a sense of promise. Yes, thinking about the outlets too.

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  5. If ever there's another renovation, someone will say, "This fellow did it right!" I contrast your renovation with a new building going up in St. Petersburg — all fiberboard!!

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    1. These are things, Mark, that make it difficult to compare between bids. Having worked on old houses before, I'm sure my contractor expected to sister all of the joists even though I didn't know it. Another contractor might have cut that corner and offered a lower price.

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  6. I think it's ALL exciting! Thank you, THANK YOU for sharing this with us. (I imagine that I will have flashbacks as this process proceeds ... from my own old house kitchen renovation a few years ago.)

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  7. what kind of other lighting are you considering. our electrician talked me into recessed can lights and i totally regret them. i never, ever use them and they are ugly. learn from my mistake!

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    1. Janet,
      I'd like to know more. Are the can lights in the open areas and light the floor or are they over the countertops?

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  8. Steve
    Only you can make studs (as in walls) sound interesting...you truly have a gift!!

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    1. Cindy,
      There's a joke in there somewhere....

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  9. Steve progress!! I love watching along with you and so inspired you have taken on this project.
    Keep up the great work and I can't wait to see more!
    xoxo
    Karena
    Tom Scheerer Decorates:
    Book Giveaway!

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    1. Karena,
      That's a nice giveaway! I just won one, haven't gotten it yet. But I hope some of followers will visit and check it out.

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  10. That’s a boatload of work you have going on there. The 6 by’s are a great idea for adding depth to the wall so the plumbing stack stays hidden. Combined with the 2 x 4’s , having straight walls will make all the difference for your cabinets and are worth every penny of the added cost. You have a great contractor.

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    1. It's interesting to see the joists of the second floor are perfectly level. I imagine they used a water lever to set those but I wonder if they had anything to check if the studs were plumb in the 1840s. It seems not.

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  11. Looking forward to your lighting plan...plan for extra outlets!

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    1. I had one outlet in the old kitchen so I'm bumping that up for sure.

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  12. Our electrician has deemed our kitchen bright enough to perform surgery...so amazing what different types of lighting will do for you...under cabinet lighting is a must......I'm still thinking you'll be finished before you know I...Thanksgiving at your house ... so much has already been accomplished...just pick your lighting already :)
    am

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    1. Thank god for dimmers! But what if you didn't have upper cabinets? Wait, how about lights under the lowers?

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  13. Lookin' good, lookin' good. What I'm most excited about is that big, gaping hole in the wall. Connecting the kitchen to the out-of-doors is a divine idea. And the light coming in will be amazing. Will be curious to find out what you've designed lighting-wise,. as well as what you've learned from your research. I know next to nothing about lighting design, so I'll be an eager student.

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    1. Camille! I want you to come up with a pattern for my back porch. Got any ideas?

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    2. I think I'd like to paint (or stain) some design onto the floor of the porch. Maybe split the length into three "rugs." One in the center in front of the French doors and one on each side to break up the long, narrow space. Some design that works with the style of the house. Got anything up your sleeve?

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  14. I can't wait to see the porch. And I disagree and believe that a space can be over-lit and look tacky or not like home. But Steve I trust you will do it in style as always.
    nat

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    1. Natalie,
      I'm trying to think about the different uses of the room and consider a lighting scenario for each. Cooking, washing dishes or perhaps having dinner at the center table.

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  15. That's a lot of sisters! but well worth it for the final result. Am so pleased to see how much insulation you will be able to add. You will not believe the difference it will make. Happy to see so much progress.

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    1. Webb,
      If you only knew how excited I am about the insulation! The walls had none. It should be nice and toasty this winter.

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  16. Can't wait to see the lights you choose. I can already envision how fabulous this is going to be!

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    1. Phyllis,
      I have it narrowed down to about four different sets. There are just too many choices!

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  17. Very well thought out. Not the exciting part but the important part...well maybe the insulation is exciting. Have fun picking the lighting.

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    1. I agree, not exciting, but I think it's good to share for people who might be considering doing this to see how much is involved. I wouldn't have thought of half of this stuff.

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  18. I have 7 can lights in my kitchen and it is very bright, however they are a pain in the butt to keep clean! Grease, smoke, normal cooking, not to mention dust and cobwebs. I thought having can lighting would be so great no fixtures to clean boy was I wrong. My old lights I could take the globes off wash them or throw them in the dishwasher and they looked good as new and they were very old. Stick with fixtures for a historic home. Now I do love my puck lights under the cabinets and I have a little lamp on the counter in one spot. I have learned having many sources of light on dimmers is the way to go.

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    1. It sounds like you keep your house spic and span. I'm seeing a lot of people recently using lamps in their kitchen. It sounds like you're a trend setter!

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  19. This is so exciting! Your contractor seems very sharp. And . . . the best thing about my kitchen reno was insulation. It used to be the coldest room in winter and hottest in summer. Not anymore!

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    1. Yes, I'm looking forward to hanging out in the toasty warm kitchen watching Julia Child and making cassoulet in January.

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  20. This is so exciting- I am so happy for you and love to see the process in the remodel. Your art piece is running this Friday, so thanks again for sharing what's on your walls!
    xo Nancy

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    1. I'm looking forward to the day everything gets sheetrocked. That when it starts to look like something new.

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  21. We, too, have been in the process of a kitchen reconfiguration...we did put undercounter lights in as well as lighting in all the top of the cabinets...then...I thought that to garish so hubby took quarter round and made, I guess, "hoods." Did the trick...I don't see the lights but get the nice reflection. It is a process of tweaks (aren't you glad I didn't say "twerks!" :)Good Luck!! franki

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    1. I'm sure I'll have some twerking to do in my kitchen too :).

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  22. Progress! I'm as excited about the porches as the kitchens.

    We have small square recessed ceiling lights in our kitchen in the country that are surprisngly attractive. I'll see if I can find a picture.

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    1. I am too. I'm looking forward to napping on the porch upstairs next summer.

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  23. Our older place ( that's ours for just a bit longer) has glass block set into the brick instead of a back splash-I'm so used to it now that other places look weird to me when I see no natural light under the cabinets! So much fun to see this space come together-still don't know why Oprah hasn't visited you yet ;)

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    1. Why Oprah? I mean she's welcome to visit anytime she'd like but why she's coming here? Does she have a new car for me?

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  24. Use mold and mildew resistant wall board. When moist air sits behind your cabinets THINGS grow! Ann

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  25. One tip I'll pass on that came from Kelly's Kitchen Sync book was using cement board behind stove/cooktop areas to make it more "fire proof". I'm using conduction cooktops, but I used it any way, especially behind the area with the double ovens will go. They don't self clean without lots of heat!

    I'm not having upper cabinets either and I hate puck lights that turn ceilings into runways. Dimmers everywhere!

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    1. Did she tile it where it's exposed? Makes sense behind ovens for sure but it seems like it would need to be tiles where exposed behind a cook top.

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  26. Lots work going on! Can't wait to see the finished product.

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    1. Me too, Bonnie. We're going on two months. But at least I haven't reached that "GET OUT OF MY HOUSE" stage yet.

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  27. This looks so familiar to me. It will be so great when it's finished.

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    1. I'm sure your house has the same ugly bones. My friends find it very scary and can't help but to think it should just be burned down.

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  28. Steve, last weekend I spent 2days going back to the start of your blog. I then read every entry and the entire remake of your home. This is so exciting to me. I've always wanted to do what you did. Buy a dream house and make it yours. I'm really excited to see your choices for the kitchen. If you go with gas, make sure it's dual fuel. Otherwise you will think your in a restaurant kitchen. Way too hot. Been there, done that. Costly mistake. I thought a gas oven would be great for my popovers. Yea, they loved it. Me, not so much. I could only bake in Dec.-Feb. here in Texas. Just FYI.
    Hilary

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    1. Hilary,
      Thank you so much for reading the whole blog. That's a huge task! Interesting comment about the dual fuel. I've read reviews that say there's not a big difference in terms of cooking but never considered the gas stove would heat the kitchen up more. Is that what you're saying? Thankfully we're not as hot as Texas.

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  29. You had me at 2x6 stud walls and foam insulation. Two things I wish I had done. I love watching this stuff. Looking forward to following along.

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    1. Welcome, Linda. I know, I feel lucky to get a chance to get a nice bed of insulation in the walls.

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  30. Stud monger! Hey...why aren't they stud brothers? Brothered In? I like my recessesed lights (above shelves...hockeys below) all on dimmers. and would kill for some of those articulating sconces...those would be smashing in your Bostonian casa!

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  31. Thank goodness you are back into building up and not tearing down - now I can relax a little!

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  32. Hi Steve,
    I am here watching your every move...just quieter these days. :) The house progress is amazing and I hope you plan to stay in it a very long time.

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  33. Sounds like you have it under control and have a great plan...cant wait to see the transformation!

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  34. Don't forget to think about light switch locations before those walls get sheetrocked. Depending on how many fixtures you have, the switches can take up some serious back splash space and cabinets can end up limiting wall space next to doorways where switches are usually located. You may want to be able to turn the lights on as you enter from the french doors AND as you enter from the dining room. My big regret is that I didn't locate a switch near the sink for the over sink fixtures.

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